Taare Zameen Par Story Inspired/Copied from Thank You Mr. Falker

Taare Zameen par story has been copied from the book ‘Thank You Mr. Falker’ by Patricia Polacco. This is an autobiographical account of her struggle with dyslexia and how she was helped by her teacher.

Here is the link to the book that Taare Zameen par has been copied from.

http://www.patriciapolacco.com/books/falker/falker_index.html

Here is the link to the book on amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Thank-You-Falker-Patricia-Polacco/dp/0399231668

Anyways here are the excerpts from the editorial reviews on amazon.

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal
Kindergarten-Grade 4AOnce more Polacco shares a personal story with engaging results. This moving saga of her struggle with a learning disability makes an inspiring picture book. Young Tricia wants desperately to read but when she starts school she finds that the words “wiggle” on the page. Teased by her classmates, she retreats into dreams and drawings. It’s not until the family moves to California and Tricia has managed to reach the fifth grade that a new teacher finally recognizes her pain and distress. What’s more, he does something about it. Without belaboring the point, the author clearly shows the ways that children internalize critical comments made by others and suffer for their differences. This touching story is accompanied by illustrations in Polacco’s signature style. Youngsters, as well as adults, may find themselves choked up at the emotions so eloquently described in words and pictures. Yet, like the tears young Tricia cries at the end of the book, these are ultimately tears of joy. Thank you, indeed, Mr. Felker (the real name of the teacher involved) for making it all possible. Readers will be grateful for the chance to recognize, appreciate, and share in Polacco’s talent and creativity.
ALisa Dennis, The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, PA
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Parents’ Choice® Tricia, who has a yearning to learn to read because of her family’s love of learning, discovers that letters in books seem to be all wiggling shapes. As she progresses through school, her classmates scorn her as dumb. She believes them . . . until Fifth Grade when she is blessed with a wonderful teacher, Mr. Falker.
Based on her own bleak difficulties in elementary school, the author/illustrator has dedicated this touching picture book memoir to the real Mr. Falker. Every classroom should not only have this book, it should be read aloud. Without saying the word “dyslexia” or preaching, Polacco has produced a compassionate story that will comfort the troubled and trouble the comfortable. A 1998 Parents’ Choice® Gold Award.
Reviewed by Kemie Nix, Parents’ Choice® 1998

From Booklist Ages 5^-9.
Like many of Polacco’s picture-book stories, this one is autobiographical. Who would believe that this gifted storyteller had started off with a serious learning disability? From kindergarten on, Trisha gets attention because she can draw; but she hides the fact that she can’t read–all she sees on the page are “wiggling shapes” –until her fifth-grade teacher discovers Trisha’s problem, gets her special help, and sets her free. “That little girl was me,” Polacco says in a final note. As always she tells the story with intense emotion: no understatement here; reading is “torture.” The big line-and-watercolor illustrations are bright with color and theatrical gesture, expressing the child’s happiness with her grandparents in a family of readers, her fear and loneliness in the classroom (“she hated hated hated school”), her anguish when the kids jeer at her in the schoolyard, and her joy when finally she reads the words on the page (“she was happy, so very happy”). Trisha isn’t idealized: we see her messy and desperate, poring over her books. This will encourage the child who feels like a failure and the teacher who cares.
Hazel Rochman

From Kirkus Reviews
An autobiographical tribute to Polacco’s fifth-grade teacher, the first adult to recognize her learning disability and to help her learn to read. Trisha begins kindergarten with high hopes, but as the years go by she becomes convinced she is dumb. She can draw well, but is desperately frustrated by math and reading. In fifth grade, Mr. Falker silences the children who taunt Trisha, and begins, with a reading teacher, to help her after school. A thank-you to a teacher who made a difference is always welcome, but this one is unbearably sentimental. Although the perspective is supposed to be Trisha’s, many sentences give away the adult viewpoint, e.g., “She didn’t notice that Mr. Falker and Miss Plessy had tears in their eyes.” The extent to which Trisha limns her own misery and deifies Mr. Falker (complete with a classroom version of a “He who is without sin among you” scene) is mawkish. Mr. Falker’s implicit sense of fairness“Right from the start, it didn’t seem to matter to Mr. Falker which kids were the cutest. Or the smartest. Or the best at anything”is contradicted when Trisha is the object of praise: Mr. Falker, watching her draw, whispers, “This is brilliant . . . absolutely brilliant. Do you know how talented you are?” Polacco’s disdain for all the other teachers and the students intrudes on Trisha’s more profoundly heartbreaking perspective; the book lacks the author’s usual flair for making personal stories universal.
(Picture book. 5-9) —
Copyright ©1998, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

Book Description
Little Trisha is overjoyed at the thought of starting school and learning how to read. But when she looks at a book, all the letters and numbers just get jumbled up. Her classmates make matters worse by calling her dummy. Only Mr. Falker, a stylish, fun-loving new teacher, recognizes Trisha’s incredible artistic ability–and her problem, and takes the time to lead her finally and happily to the magic of reading. This autobiographical story is close to author Patricia Polacco’s heart. It is her personal song of thanks to teachers like Mr. Falker, who quietly but surely change the lives of the children they teach. Patricia Polacco lives in Union City, MI.

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