2014 Oscar Nominations

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Check out the 2014 Oscar Nominations complete list

Best Picture
“12 Years a Slave”
“American Hustle”
“Gravity”
“The Wolf of Wall Street”
“Dallas Buyers Club”
“Her”
“Nebraska”
“Philomena”
“Captain Phillips”

Best Director
Alfonso Cuarón, “Gravity”
David O. Russell, “American Hustle”
Steve McQueen, “12 Years a Slave”
Alexander Payne, “Nebraska”
Martin Scorsese, “The Wolf of Wall Street”

Best Actor
Christian Bale, “American Hustle”
Bruce Dern, “Nebraska”
Leonardo DiCaprio, “The Wolf of Wall Street”
Chiwetel Ejiofor, “12 Years a Slave”
Matthew McConaughey, “Dallas Buyer’s Club”

Best Actress
Amy Adams, “American Hustle”
Cate Blanchett, “Blue Jasmine”
Sandra Bullock, “Gravity”
Judi Dench, “Philomena”
Meryl Streep, “August: Osage County”

 

Best Supporting Actor
Barkhad Abdi, “Captain Phillips”
Bradley Cooper, “American Hustle”
Michael Fassbender, “12 Years a Slave”
Jonah Hill, “The Wolf of Wall Street”
James Gandolfini, “Enough Said”
Jared Leto, “Dallas Buyer’s Club”

Best Supporting Actress
Jennifer Lawrence, “American Hustle”
Sally Hawkins, “Blue Jasmine”
Lupita Nyong’o, “12 Years a Slave”
Julia Roberts, “August: Osage County”

Best Animated Feature
“The Croods”
“Despicable Me 2”
“Ernest and Celestine”
“Frozen”
“The Wind Rises”June Squibb, “Nebraska”

Best Original Song

“Alone Yet Not Alone” from “Alone Yet Not Alone”
“The Moon Song” from “Her,”  Karen O. and Spike Jonze
“Let It Go” from “Frozen,” Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez
“Ordinary Love” from “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom,” U2 (Bono, The Edge, Adam Clayton, and Larry Mullen Jr.) and Danger Mouse (Brian Burton)
“Happy” from “Despicable Me 2,” Pharrell Williams

Best Cinematography

“The Grandmaster” Philippe Le Sourd
“Gravity” Emmanuel Lubezki
“Inside Llewyn Davis” Bruno Delbonnel
“Nebraska” Phedon Papamichael
“Prisoners” Roger A. Deakins

Best Costume Design

“American Hustle” Michael Wilkinson
“The Grandmaster” William Chang Suk Ping
“The Great Gatsby” Catherine Martin
“The Invisible Woman” Michael O’Connor
“12 Years a Slave” Patricia Norris

Best Documentary Feature

“The Act of Killing”Joshua Oppenheimer and Signe Byrge Sørensen
“Cutie and the Boxer” Zachary Heinzerling and Lydia Dean Pilcher
“Dirty Wars” Richard Rowley and Jeremy Scahill
“The Square” Jehane Noujaim and Karim Amer
“20 Feet from Stardom” Nominees to be determined

Best Documentary Short Subject

“CaveDigger” Jeffrey Karoff
“Facing Fear” Jason Cohen
“Karama Has No Walls” Sara Ishaq
“The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life” Malcolm Clarke and Nicholas Reed
“Prison Terminal: The Last Days of Private Jack Hall” Edgar Barens

Best Film Editing

“American Hustle” Jay Cassidy, Crispin Struthers and Alan Baumgarten
“Captain Phillips” Christopher Rouse
“Dallas Buyers Club” John Mac McMurphy and Martin Pensa
“Gravity” Alfonso Cuarón and Mark Sanger
“12 Years a Slave” Joe Walker

Best Foreign Language Film 

“The Broken Circle Breakdown” Belgium
“The Great Beauty” Italy
“The Hunt” Denmark
“The Missing Picture” Cambodia
“Omar” Palestine

Best Makeup and Hairstyling

“Dallas Buyers Club” Adruitha Lee and Robin Mathews
“Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa” Stephen Prouty
“The Lone Ranger” Joel Harlow and Gloria Pasqua-Casny

Best Original Score

“The Book Thief” John Williams
“Gravity” Steven Price
“Her” William Butler and Owen Pallett
“Philomena” Alexandre Desplat
“Saving Mr. Banks” Thomas Newman

Best Production Design

“American Hustle” Production Design: Judy Becker; Set Decoration: Heather Loeffler
“Gravity” Production Design: Andy Nicholson; Set Decoration: Rosie Goodwin and Joanne Woollard
“The Great Gatsby” Production Design: Catherine Martin; Set Decoration: Beverley Dunn
“Her” Production Design: K.K. Barrett; Set Decoration: Gene Serdena
“12 Years a Slave” Production Design: Adam Stockhausen; Set Decoration: Alice Baker

Best Animated Short Film

“Feral” Daniel Sousa and Dan Golden
“Get a Horse!” Lauren MacMullan and Dorothy McKim
“Mr. Hublot” Laurent Witz and Alexandre Espigares
“Possessions” Shuhei Morita
“Room on the Broom” Max Lang and Jan Lachauer

Best Live Action Short Film

“Aquel No Era Yo (That Wasn’t Me)” Esteban Crespo
“Avant Que De Tout Perdre (Just before Losing Everything)” Xavier Legrand and Alexandre Gavras
“Helium” Anders Walter and Kim Magnusson
“Pitääkö Mun Kaikki Hoitaa? (Do I Have to Take Care of Everything?)” Selma Vilhunen and Kirsikka Saari
“The Voorman Problem” Mark Gill and Baldwin Li

Best Sound Editing

“All Is Lost” Steve Boeddeker and Richard Hymns
“Captain Phillips” Oliver Tarney
“Gravity” Glenn Freemantle
“The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” Brent Burge
“Lone Survivor” Wylie Stateman

Best Sound Mixing

“Captain Phillips” Chris Burdon, Mark Taylor, Mike Prestwood Smith and Chris Munro
“Gravity” Skip Lievsay, Niv Adiri, Christopher Benstead and Chris Munro
“The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” Christopher Boyes, Michael Hedges, Michael Semanick and Tony Johnson
“Inside Llewyn Davis” Skip Lievsay, Greg Orloff and Peter F. Kurland
“Lone Survivor” Andy Koyama, Beau Borders and David Brownlow

Best Visual Effects

“Gravity” Tim Webber, Chris Lawrence, Dave Shirk and Neil Corbould
“The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon, David Clayton and Eric Reynolds
“Iron Man 3” Christopher Townsend, Guy Williams, Erik Nash and Dan Sudick
“The Lone Ranger” Tim Alexander, Gary Brozenich, Edson Williams and John Frazier
“Star Trek Into Darkness” Roger Guyett, Patrick Tubach, Ben Grossmann and Burt Dalton

Best Adapted screenplay

“Before Midnight” Written by Richard Linklater, Julie Delpy, Ethan Hawke
“Captain Phillips” Screenplay by Billy Ray
“Philomena” Screenplay by Steve Coogan and Jeff Pope
“12 Years a Slave” Screenplay by John Ridley
“The Wolf of Wall Street” Screenplay by Terence Winter

Best Original screenplay

“American Hustle” Written by Eric Warren Singer and David O. Russell
“Blue Jasmine” Written by Woody Allen
“Dallas Buyers Club” Written by Craig Borten & Melisa Wallack
“Her” Written by Spike Jonze
“Nebraska” Written by Bob Nelson

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32 Comments
  1. cr7 5 years ago

    I was about to post it 😀

    Pretty much on the expected line . Absence of Tom Hanks is the biggest surprise .And not a single nomination for Rush .

    Have to see Philomena and Nebraska . I read the synopsis .Both of them looks good . And I’m a big fan of Alexander Payne .

  2. Ipman 5 years ago

    anyone seen the grandmaster? how is it compared to ipman?

  3. Author
    sputnik 5 years ago

    Not a single nomination for Rush which was one of the best movies of the year. Rush was better than The Wolf of Wall Street both as a movie as well as direction wise.

    No Supporting Actor nomination for Daniel Bruhl either. Jonah Hill gets nominated for a WTF performance. James Gandolfini gets nominated because he died.

    Rush did not have good Cinematography?

    American Hustle was so boring the first half of it and it gets nominated for Best Film Editing

    LOL on Best Adapted screenplay nomination for The Wolf of Wall Street

    Blue Jasmine getting Best Original screenplay nomination is a joke as it is a uncredited adaptation of A Streetcar named Desire.

    • Author
      sputnik 5 years ago

      “Jonah Hill was already an Oscar nominee before he got the part as Donnie Azoff in The Wolf of Wall Street, but Hill wanted the role so incredibly bad, he took a significant pay cut to star in the film. How much exactly? Read below.

      Hill appeared on The Howard Stern Show (via E! Online) and revealed he was only paid $60,000 for the seven month shoot.

      For most of us, that’s a lot of money. But for an actor, especially one of Hill’s fame, it’s peanuts. It’s even less when you consider how long the shoot was, and that some actors get millions for a mere few weeks of filming. This only works out to about $8,600 per month.

      But, of course, it paid off and Hill was nominated for an Oscar for his performance, which only helps his career going ahead.”

      Link

  4. cr7 5 years ago

    I really don’t understand why Prisoners and Rush getting snubbed in award shows . These two are among my top 5 movies of last year.

  5. Saurabh 5 years ago

    Share your sentiments sputnik. Lost my interest in these Oscars when The Dark Knight was snubbed for best picture and best director. Clearly the academy has it’s favourites – Scorsese, Jennifer Lawrence, DiCaprio, John Williams, David O’Russell, Roger Deakins, etc. Even if another actor or composer does a superlative work, if you’re up against these favourites, you don’t stand a chance. Bradley Cooper and Jonah Hill best supporting actors? Really? Daniel Bruhl’s Niki Lauda just crushed these ‘performances’. Would have been interesting to see him go against Jared Leto (who’s most definitely going to win). No recognition for Anthony Dod Mantle’s cinematography as well. Same goes for Hans Zimmer’s music for Rush. Christian Bale’s my favourite actor, but his performance in Out of the Furnace was leagues ahead of what he did in American Hustle. AH is all about characters and not much in terms of plot. Any movie scored by John Williams will guarantee you an Oscar Nom for music just because it’s Williams. Quality doesn’t matter. Same goes for Roger Deakins in cinematography dept. Rush was my favourite movie this year. Sad it didn’t get even the technical noms. Also no vfx nom for Man of Steel.

    • Author
      sputnik 5 years ago

      I can still live with Bradley Cooper being nominated as he acted well even though it was a irritating character. Jonah Hill totally hammed. James Gandolfini was good in Enough Said but an Oscar nomination for that? I think he got nominated just because he died. And if you notice there are six Best Supporting Actor nominations instead of the usual five. Have not seen Captain Philips yet. Yes Jared Leto will most probably win but Daniel Bruhl and Michael Fassbender were the real competitors. I liked Michael Fassbender more then Daniel Bruhl though.

      I think Rush should have been nominated for Best Original screenplay instead of Blue Jasmine.

      Anthony Dod Mantle should have been nominated for Best Cinematography for Rush. I don’t remember what was so great about the cinematography of Prisoners. It should have been nominated in more categories.

      Have not watched Out of the Furnace but will do so soon.

  6. shan 5 years ago

    No Rush in best film, best director, best supporting actor, best editing, best background score, best cinematography?? What bullshit!

    also, Jonah Hill gets nominated? Really? Oscars are as bad as Filmfare/Screen!

  7. sunil 5 years ago

    philomena has a charecter Martin Sixsmith.I know him as bbc correspondent in 1992 in us.Satellite tv was new then.This story is plagirised from old American novel.

    • Author
      sputnik 5 years ago

      The movie is an official adaptation of The Lost Child of Philomena Lee by Martin Sixsmith published in 2009.

  8. Author
    sputnik 5 years ago

    Here is a list of how much the Oscar nominated movies did at the Boxoffice.

    Link

  9. DABANGG_NIINJA 5 years ago

    salman vivek ka hug kaha he is nomination me 😛

  10. Ipman 5 years ago

    stopped halfway through the grandmaster (loosely based on ipmans life). its too fake a film for my liking. forget the wirework in the fights, even so many normal scenes are slow mo for no reason (rain drops, motion of the sleeves during fights, clothes, breaking of glasses etc).may be to make the film look obscure and deep. tony leung is more like neo of the matrix than a normal human being ,let alone ipman. Zhang zi is shown as his love interest who is the daughter of a retired grandmaster and challenges ipman to fight her. There is a scene in it where they are fighting in slow motion and while falling, there is a close up of ipman and her face to show that she is falling in love with her while she falls on the ground. that scene made me realise this movie is just not cut for me.Donnie yens ipman was a masterpiece but watching this makes me respect donnie yens version even more

  11. Ipman 5 years ago

    Found the scene. watch 1:53

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=1uDJerYw4Bs

    • Ipman 5 years ago

      an excellent comment from imdb on the grandmaster and in particular wing chun depiction in films

      “While both Leung and Zhang have experience in action movies, they are not Donnie Yen and Michelle Yeoh. Still, we have good action sequences thanks to first class choreographed and editing. People knowledgeable in martial arts will just have to accept the shortcomings. In trying to pay tribute to the Bruce Lee movies, this movie has its own “8 kicks” sequence deployed quite suitably at the point where Ip, trying to start a new livelihood in Hong Kong in teaching martial arts, wants to impress prospective students by showing his stuff. Unfortunately, kicking is nowhere near being important in the Wing Chun arsenal. Wing Chun kicks are never aimed above the knees, used mainly to demolish the opponent’s footwork. But even an auteur like Wong is not immune to market forces, and Bruce Lee style head-level kick do sell tickets.

  12. Saurabh 5 years ago

    I had downloaded a good print of Grandmasters early last year. But the excessive use of slo mo put me off and simply deleted it. Continuously distracted me from the scenes. Even in normal scenes where there is no action. Ipman’s right. Leung’s Ipman is Neo and just isn’t my cup of tea. Couldn’t even finish the film halfway through.

  13. cr7 5 years ago

    Critics Choice Award

    The complete list of winners:

    Picture: “12 Years a Slave”

    Actor: Matthew McConaughey, “Dallas Buyers Club”

    Actress: Cate Blanchett, “Blue Jasmine”

    Supporting actor: Jared Leto, “Dallas Buyers Club”

    Supporting actress: Lupita Nyong’o, “12 Years a Slave”

    Young Actor/Actress: Adele Exarchopoulos, “Blue Is The Warmest Color”

    Acting Ensemble: “American Hustle”

    Director: Alfonso Cuarón, “Gravity”

    Original screenplay: Spike Jonze, “Her”

    Adapted screenplay: John Ridley, “12 Years a Slave”

    Cinematography: Emmanuel Lubezki, “Gravity”

    Art direction: Catherine Martin (production designer), Beverley Dunn (set decorator), “The Great Gatsby”

    Editing: Alfonso Cuarón and Mark Sanger, “Gravity”

    Costume design: Catherine Martin, “The Great Gatsby”

    Hair and makeup: “American Hustle”

    Visual effects: “Gravity”

    Animated feature: “Frozen”

    Action movie: “Lone Survivor”

    Actor in an action movie: Mark Wahlberg, “Lone Survivor”

    Actress in an action movie: Sandra Bullock, “Gravity”

    Comedy: “American Hustle”

    Actor in a comedy: Leonardo DiCaprio, “The Wolf of Wall Street”

    Actress in a comedy: Amy Adams, “American Hustle”

    Sci-fi/horror movie: “Gravity”

    Foreign language film: “Blue Is the Warmest Color”

    Documentary feature: “20 Feet From Stardom”

    Song: “Let It Go” Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez, “Frozen”

    Score: Steven Price, “Gravity”

  14. cr7 5 years ago

    2014 Screen Actors Guild Awards winners – complete list

    THEATRICAL MOTION PICTURES

    Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role
    Matthew McConaughey, “Dallas Buyers Club”

    Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
    Cate Blanchett, “Blue Jasmine”

    Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role
    Jared Leto, “Dallas Buyers Club”

    Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
    Lupita Nyong’o, “12 Years a Slave”

    TELEVISION PROGRAMS

    Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries
    Michael Douglas, “Behind the Candelabra”

    Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries
    Helen Mirren, “Phil Spector”

    Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
    Bryan Cranston, Breaking Bad”

    Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series
    Maggie Smith, “Downton Abbey”

    Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series
    Ty Burrell, “Modern Family”

    Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series
    Julia Louis-Drefus, “Veep”

    Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series
    “Breaking Bad” (Michael Bowen, Betsy Brandt, Bryan Cranston, Lavell Crawford, Tait Fletcher, Laura Fraser, Anna Gunn, Matthew T. Metzler, RJ Mitte, Dean Norris, Bob Odenkirk, Aaron Paul, Jesse Plemons, Steve Michael Quezada, Kevin Rankin, Patrick Sane)

    Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series
    “Modern Family” (Julie Bowen, Ty Burrell, Aubrey Anderson Emmons, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Nolan Gould, Sarah Hyland, Ed O’Neill, Rico Rodriguez, Eric Stonestreet, Sofia Vergara, Ariel Winter)

    SAG AWARDS® HONORS FOR STUNT ENSEMBLES

    Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Motion Picture
    “Lone Survivor”

    Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Comedy or Drama Series
    “Game of Thrones”

    • Author
      sputnik 5 years ago

      Good to see Lupita Nyong’o winning Supporting actress at Screen Actors Guild Awards and Critics Choice Award. I hope she wins Best Supporting Actress at the Oscars too over Jennifer Lawrence.

  15. Author
    sputnik 5 years ago

    Cate Blanchett Asks E! Why They Filmed Her Like That But Not The Men.

    Source

    • cr7 5 years ago

      LOL . She is really cool . Liked her acceptance speech in Golden Globe.

  16. cr7 5 years ago

    Hilarious. The Internet Really Wants Leonardo DiCaprio To Win An Oscar.

    Link

    • Author
      sputnik 5 years ago

      LOL

  17. shan 5 years ago

    Haha, funny! 🙂

  18. Author
    sputnik 5 years ago

    NOT ANOTHER SUNDANCE MOVIE – Spoof of Film Festival movies

    • shan 5 years ago

      Haha. Good but not as funny as the Oscar one.

    • cr7 5 years ago

      Ha ha . Too Good . Every second indie movie. Michael Cera , vintage trucks . ROFL

      • cr7 5 years ago

        The oscar parody is hilarious . ROFL .

  19. Author
    sputnik 5 years ago

    SNL Spoof of Her starring Jonah Hill and Michael Cera

    https://www.dailymotion.com/embed/video/x1abp8f

    Leonardo DiCaprio crashes Jonah Hill’s monologue to recreate ‘Titanic’

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=Q_DUYQHtwV4

  20. Author
    sputnik 5 years ago

    Oscars Rescind Controversial Song Nomination For ‘Alone Yet Not Alone’

    On Tuesday night, the Academy’s Board of Governors voted to rescind the Original Song nomination for “Alone Yet Not Alone,” music by Bruce Broughton and lyric by Dennis Spiegel. The decision was prompted by the discovery that Broughton, a former Governor and current Music Branch executive committee member, had emailed members of the branch to make them aware of his submission during the nominations voting period.

    “No matter how well-intentioned the communication, using one’s position as a former governor and current executive committee member to personally promote one’s own Oscar submission creates the appearance of an unfair advantage,” said Cheryl Boone Isaacs, Academy President.

    The Board determined that Broughton’s actions were inconsistent with the Academy’s promotional regulations, which provide, among other terms, that “it is the Academy’s goal to ensure that the Awards competition is conducted in a fair and ethical manner. If any campaign activity is determined by the Board of Governors to work in opposition to that goal, whether or not anticipated by these regulations, the Board of Governors may take any corrective actions or assess any penalties that in its discretion it deems necessary to protect the reputation and integrity of the awards process.”

    An additional nominee in the Original Song category will not be named. The remaining nominees in the category are:

    “Happy” from “Despicable Me 2”
    Music and Lyric by Pharrell Williams

    “Let It Go” from “Frozen”
    Music and Lyric by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez

    “The Moon Song” from “Her”
    Music by Karen O; Lyric by Karen O and Spike Jonze

    “Ordinary Love” from “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom”
    Music by Paul Hewson, Dave Evans, Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen; Lyric by Paul Hewson

    The members from each of the Academy’s branches vote to determine the nominees in their respective categories – actors nominate actors, film editors nominate film editors, musicians and composers nominate song and score.

    During the nominations process, all 240 voting members of the Music Branch received a Reminder List of works submitted in the Original Song category and a DVD copy of the song clips with film and song title only (additional information including composer and lyricist is not provided). Members were asked to watch the clips and then vote in the order of their preference for not more than five nominees in the category. A maximum of two songs may be nominated from any one film.

    Academy Awards® for outstanding film achievements of 2013 will be presented on Oscar® Sunday, March 2, 2014, at the Dolby Theatre® at Hollywood & Highland Center® and televised live on the ABC Television Network. The Oscars, produced by Craig Zadan and Neil Meron, also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

    Link

  21. Saurabh 5 years ago

    Broughton’s a veteran composer and having been nominated previously for Silverado, he should have known the rules. Here’s what he said: “I’m devastated. I indulged in the simplest, lamest, grass-roots campaign and it went against me when the song started getting attention. I got taken down by competition that had months of promotion and advertising behind them.”

    It’s not the first time the Academy has withdrawn nominaitons. Most famously it dropped a nod for Nino Rota’s score in 1972 for The Godfather, after finding out key portions had been used in an earlier film.

    No other song will be nominated in Alone Yet Not Alone’s place

  22. Author
    sputnik 5 years ago

    Woody Allen’s adoptive daughter Dylan Farrow’s letter about the sexual abuse she suffered from Woody Allen as a 7 year old in 1992.

    An Open Letter From Dylan Farrow

    What’s your favorite Woody Allen movie? Before you answer, you should know: when I was seven years old, Woody Allen took me by the hand and led me into a dim, closet-like attic on the second floor of our house. He told me to lay on my stomach and play with my brother’s electric train set. Then he sexually assaulted me. He talked to me while he did it, whispering that I was a good girl, that this was our secret, promising that we’d go to Paris and I’d be a star in his movies. I remember staring at that toy train, focusing on it as it traveled in its circle around the attic. To this day, I find it difficult to look at toy trains.

    For as long as I could remember, my father had been doing things to me that I didn’t like. I didn’t like how often he would take me away from my mom, siblings and friends to be alone with him. I didn’t like it when he would stick his thumb in my mouth. I didn’t like it when I had to get in bed with him under the sheets when he was in his underwear. I didn’t like it when he would place his head in my naked lap and breathe in and breathe out. I would hide under beds or lock myself in the bathroom to avoid these encounters, but he always found me. These things happened so often, so routinely, so skillfully hidden from a mother that would have protected me had she known, that I thought it was normal. I thought this was how fathers doted on their daughters. But what he did to me in the attic felt different. I couldn’t keep the secret anymore.

    When I asked my mother if her dad did to her what Woody Allen did to me, I honestly did not know the answer. I also didn’t know the firestorm it would trigger. I didn’t know that my father would use his sexual relationship with my sister to cover up the abuse he inflicted on me. I didn’t know that he would accuse my mother of planting the abuse in my head and call her a liar for defending me. I didn’t know that I would be made to recount my story over and over again, to doctor after doctor, pushed to see if I’d admit I was lying as part of a legal battle I couldn’t possibly understand. At one point, my mother sat me down and told me that I wouldn’t be in trouble if I was lying – that I could take it all back. I couldn’t. It was all true. But sexual abuse claims against the powerful stall more easily. There were experts willing to attack my credibility. There were doctors willing to gaslight an abused child.

    After a custody hearing denied my father visitation rights, my mother declined to pursue criminal charges, despite findings of probable cause by the State of Connecticut – due to, in the words of the prosecutor, the fragility of the “child victim.” Woody Allen was never convicted of any crime. That he got away with what he did to me haunted me as I grew up. I was stricken with guilt that I had allowed him to be near other little girls. I was terrified of being touched by men. I developed an eating disorder. I began cutting myself. That torment was made worse by Hollywood. All but a precious few (my heroes) turned a blind eye. Most found it easier to accept the ambiguity, to say, “who can say what happened,” to pretend that nothing was wrong. Actors praised him at awards shows. Networks put him on TV. Critics put him in magazines. Each time I saw my abuser’s face – on a poster, on a t-shirt, on television – I could only hide my panic until I found a place to be alone and fall apart.

    Last week, Woody Allen was nominated for his latest Oscar. But this time, I refuse to fall apart. For so long, Woody Allen’s acceptance silenced me. It felt like a personal rebuke, like the awards and accolades were a way to tell me to shut up and go away. But the survivors of sexual abuse who have reached out to me – to support me and to share their fears of coming forward, of being called a liar, of being told their memories aren’t their memories – have given me a reason to not be silent, if only so others know that they don’t have to be silent either.

    Today, I consider myself lucky. I am happily married. I have the support of my amazing brothers and sisters. I have a mother who found within herself a well of fortitude that saved us from the chaos a predator brought into our home.

    But others are still scared, vulnerable, and struggling for the courage to tell the truth. The message that Hollywood sends matters for them.

    What if it had been your child, Cate Blanchett? Louis CK? Alec Baldwin? What if it had been you, Emma Stone? Or you, Scarlett Johansson? You knew me when I was a little girl, Diane Keaton. Have you forgotten me?

    Woody Allen is a living testament to the way our society fails the survivors of sexual assault and abuse.

    So imagine your seven-year-old daughter being led into an attic by Woody Allen. Imagine she spends a lifetime stricken with nausea at the mention of his name. Imagine a world that celebrates her tormenter.

    Are you imagining that? Now, what’s your favorite Woody Allen movie?

    Link

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